Graduate Student Employment Opportunities

Graduate Student Employment Opportunities

SPRING 2021

Cognitive Science 170: Brain Damage

Linda Isaac
Class #: 32689
Units: 3
This course introduces students to the full range of brain damage causes, which are: traumatic brain injury (TBI) - civilian vs. military, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), stroke, tumors, infections, hypoxia, addiction, neurological, and congenital conditions. We understand how brain damage caused by each condition leads to localized and non-localized deficits in the key functions comprising cognition, emotion, physiology, social skills, behavior, and daily functioning capacity. Key co-occurring disorders are covered that present due to the fundamental brain damage causes.
PLEASE NOTE THAT THESE POSITIONS ARE PENDING BUDGETARY APPROVAL.
To apply as a reader for this course, please fill out this form.

Cognitive Science 131: Computational Models of Cognition

This course will provide advanced students in cognitive science and computer science with the skills to develop computational models of human cognition, giving insight into how people solve challenging computational problems, as well as how to bring computers closer to human performance. The course will explore three ways in which researchers have attempted to formalize cognition -- symbolic approaches, neural networks, and probability and statistics -- considering the strengths and weaknesses of each. 

PLEASE NOTE THAT THESE POSITIONS ARE PENDING BUDGETARY APPROVAL.
To apply as a reader for this course, please fill out this form.

Cognitive Science C100: Basic Issues in Cognition

Davina P Chan
Class #: 32780
Units: 3
Theoretical foundations and current controversies in cognitive science will be discussed. Basic issues in cognition--including perception, imagery, memory, categorization, thinking, judgment, and development--will be considered from the perspectives of philosophy, psychology, computer science, and physiology. Particular emphasis will be placed on the nature, implications, and limitations of the computational model of mind.
PLEASE NOTE THAT THESE POSITIONS ARE PENDING BUDGETARY APPROVAL.
To apply as a reader for this course, please fill out this form.

Cognitive Science 190: Special Topics in CogSci: Topics TBA 

PLEASE NOTE THAT THESE POSITIONS ARE PENDING BUDGETARY APPROVAL.
To apply as a reader for this course, please fill out this form.

FALL 2020

Cognitive Science 172: Clinical Applications in Cognitive Neuroscience

Linda Isaac
Class #: 31728
Units: 3
Cognitive Neuroscience has provided a paradigm shift in our understanding of brain structure and function. We have excitingly transitioned from a scientific approach to brain science that relied primarily on overt behavioral observation and making anatomical inferences based on those behaviors to probing the brain in ways that were once considered inconceivable. Scientific and technology (imaging) developments now enable neuroscientists to view, investigate, measure, and influence the brain directly. An understanding of both structure and function then advances our knowledge of the mechanisms involved in cognitive processes underlying neural systems.
To apply as a reader for this course, please fill out this form.

Cognitive Science 170: Brain Damage

Linda Isaac
Class #: 31726
Units: 3
This course introduces students to the full range of brain damage causes, which are: traumatic brain injury (TBI) - civilian vs. military, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), stroke, tumors, infections, hypoxia, addiction, neurological, and congenital conditions. We understand how brain damage caused by each condition leads to localized and non-localized deficits in the key functions comprising cognition, emotion, physiology, social skills, behavior, and daily functioning capacity. Key co-occurring disorders are covered that present due to the fundamental brain damage causes.
To apply as a reader for this course, please fill out this form.

Cognitive Science 131: Computational Models of Cognition

This course will provide advanced students in cognitive science and computer science with the skills to develop computational models of human cognition, giving insight into how people solve challenging computational problems, as well as how to bring computers closer to human performance. The course will explore three ways in which researchers have attempted to formalize cognition -- symbolic approaches, neural networks, and probability and statistics -- considering the strengths and weaknesses of each. 
PLEASE NOTE THAT THESE POSITIONS ARE PENDING BUDGETARY APPROVAL.
To apply as a reader for this course, please fill out this form.

Cognitive Science C100: Basic Issues in Cognition

Davina P Chan
Class #: 26419
Units: 3
Theoretical foundations and current controversies in cognitive science will be discussed. Basic issues in cognition--including perception, imagery, memory, categorization, thinking, judgment, and development--will be considered from the perspectives of philosophy, psychology, computer science, and physiology. Particular emphasis will be placed on the nature, implications, and limitations of the computational model of mind.
To apply as a reader for this course, please fill out this form.

Cognitive Science 1: Section 001 - Introduction to Cognitive Science

Linda Isaac
Class #: 25321
Units: 4
This course introduces the interdisciplinary field of cognitive science. Lectures and readings will survey research from artificial intelligence, pyschology, linguistics, philosophy, and neuroscience, and will cover topics such as the nature of knowledge, thinking, remembering, vision, imagery, language, and consciousness. Sections will demonstrate some of the major methodologies.
To apply as a reader for this course, please fill out this form.

Cognitive Science 1: Section 002 - Introduction to Cognitive Science

Davina P Chan
Class #: 32879
Units: 4
This course introduces the interdisciplinary field of cognitive science. Lectures and readings will survey research from artificial intelligence, pyschology, linguistics, philosophy, and neuroscience, and will cover topics such as the nature of knowledge, thinking, remembering, vision, imagery, language, and consciousness. Sections will demonstrate some of the major methodologies.
To apply as a reader for this course, please fill out this form.

SUMMER 2020

The following courses are recruiting graduate students to act as Readers -- pending budgetary approval -- for summer 2020

CogSci N1: Introduction to Cognitive Science

CogSci 170: Brain Damage

CogSci 131: Computational Models of Cognition

Interested students can submit their application form here

SPRING 2020

Cognitive Science 131: Computational Models of Cognition

This course will provide advanced students in cognitive science and computer science with the skills to develop computational models of human cognition, giving insight into how people solve challenging computational problems, as well as how to bring computers closer to human performance. The course will explore three ways in which researchers have attempted to formalize cognition -- symbolic approaches, neural networks, and probability and statistics -- considering the strengths and weaknesses of each. 
PLEASE NOTE THAT THESE POSITIONS ARE PENDING BUDGETARY APPROVAL.
To apply to GSI for this course, please fill out this form.

Cognitive Science 1: Introduction to Cognitive Science 

Cognitive Science explores one of sciences final frontiers; the scientific study of the mind. It is a broad interdisciplinary field that encompasses research from areas in neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, linguistics, anthropology, and computer science. This course will discuss some of the classic questions about the mind, and will review how the disciplines that contribute to cognitive science guide us in answering them.

 PLEASE NOTE THAT THESE POSITIONS ARE PENDING BUDGETARY APPROVAL.
 To apply to GSI for this course, please send an email with the following information to paulli@berkeley.edu
 1. Your CV
2. A description of prior teaching experience, including references

3. Any further information you would like to supply

Cognitive Science 1: Introduction to Cognitive Science

Professor Linda Isaac is planning to teach a second section of Cognitive Science 1 in Spring 2020. She will need 3 GSIs.  PLEASE NOTE THAT THESE POSITIONS ARE PENDING BUDGETARY APPROVAL

To apply to GSI for this course, please fill out this form.

FALL 2019

GSIs Needed: Cognitive Science 1: Introduction to Cognitive Science. Professor Ben Pageler
To apply to GSI for this course, please fill out this form.

Reader Needed: Cognitive Science 190.003: Brain Damange. Professor Linda Isaac. To apply to be a Reader for this course, please fill out this form. 

Reader Needed: Cognitive Science 190.001: Clinical Applications in Cognitive Neuroscience. To apply to be a Reader for this course, please fill out this form.

Reader Needed: Cognitive Science 190.002: The Cognitive Unconscious. To apply to be a Reader for this course, please fill out this form.